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How Office Printer Ink Differs From Home PC Printer Ink

2010-07-01

Many computers have attached printers, but printers serve a variety of different purposes depending on their users. Office printers and home printers are quite different in construction, and what's more, nearly every element of the devices differs depending on its intended use. This extends to printer ink; office printer ink is very different from home computer printer ink, and cartridges are built with the specific needs of their intended users in mind. Knowing these differences can be somewhat helpful when buying printer ink cartridges, because the more you know about your printer and its ink cartridges, the easier it can be to understand ink costs.

One of the more obvious differences between printer ink at home and in the office is the physical size of cartridges. Office printer ink cartridges contain a lot more ink, since they're used a lot more frequently. They can also contain larger print heads, depending on the size and scaling abilities of the printer. A3 printers, which use much larger than average paper, often have extremely large cartridges to match. As one might imagine, larger cartridges cost more, though they're actually less expensive than home printer ink cartridges on a per print basis. Like home printer cartridges, office printer ink has an expiration date. After this expiration date passes, the ink may go bad, and it could begin to clog up the print heads. This can result in costly printer repairs or wasted printer ink cartridges. On office printers, clogged heads tend to be less likely, since there aren't long periods where the printer isn't being used; therefore, their cartridges can be larger, even for offices that don't use massive amounts of ink every day.

The ink itself in printer ink cartridges is usually very similar or the same. Sometimes, some of the compounds in ink which affect its texture are changed. Higher quality ink may be used in certain home printers, as home printer users are often more demanding in quality. However, most of the higher quality of home prints comes from the design of the printer itself rather than the ink cartridges used.

Before buying a new printer, be sure to pick a product that matches your needs. Whether you're using an office printer or a printer designed for home consumers, you'll need a device that will easily handle your print load at the quality level that you expect. Printer ink is certainly an important part of this, and learning the differences can help you to select a printer that's perfect for your home or office computer (and ink cartridges that are well within your budget).

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